Video: ER Doctor Drops Multiple COVID-19 Bombshells

As we reported earlier this month only nine states in America that are not under stay-at-home orders by their governors.

Utah, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Iowa, Oklahoma, Arkansas,, and South Carolina are now the only states where residents are not under orders to only leave their homes for “essential” purposes.

“The contrast is the starkest in five states — Arkansas, Iowa, Nebraska, North Dakota,, and South Dakota — where there are no such orders in place, either in major cities or statewide. Another four had partial restrictions issued locally in certain cities or counties,” the New York Times reports.

Is this the right thing to do at this moment? Well, the Association of American Physicians and Surgeons thinks that this is the best thing we can do at the moment.

The only way to effectively combat the disease from a practical standpoint (other than herd immunity) is to shield those at high risk until the virus has run its course through the country. Patients with significant underlying health conditions (cancer, lung disease, immune deficiency disorders) and those over the age of 65 should isolate themselves to the best of their abilities – the Association Of America Physician and Surgeons reported.

Everything that was done so far will only damage our economy and one ER doctor confirmed that the lockdown is not needed.

Before COVID-19 was even detected in the United States, Dan Erickson, a former emergency room physician who now co-owns Accelerated Urgent Care in Bakersfield, bought as many tests for the virus as he could. He knew it would be here eventually and wanted to be ready to test those who needed and wanted it.

Now, after testing thousands of people, he and his business partner, physician Artin Massihi, say they have enough data to draw some conclusions about COVID-19.

Their message: COVID-19 is more ubiquitous and less deadly than we think. It’s similar to influenza and we should therefore reopen society and stop treating the situation like the lethal menace it was initially thought to be.

“Two months ago we didn’t know this so I’m bringing it to light now,” Erickson said Wednesday at a news conference held at his Coffee Road urgent care.

Kern County Public Health Services Spokeswoman Michelle Corson and an epidemiologist contacted by The Californian said they didn’t agree with the doctors’ recommendation to end social distancing and immediately start reopening society.

“This is a many-headed hydra. It’s really unfortunate to boil this all down to it’s just flu,” said Andrew Noymer, associate professor of public health at UC Irvine. “There’s no flu season that looks anything like New York does right now.”

‘Similar to flu’

Accelerated urgent care has done 5,213 COVID-19 tests at its five Bakersfield locations, Erickson said — which is more than half the 9,197 tests done so far in Kern County. Of those, 340 were positive, according to Erickson.

If that percentage of positive cases were assumed to represent the entire population of Kern County, which is roughly 900,000, it would mean about 58,000 people in Kern have had the virus, far more than the nearly 700 official confirmed, Erickson said.

That many cases would “indicate there is a widespread (COVID-19) infection, similar to flu,” Erickson said.

And if we don’t shut down the country for flu, should we keep doing it for coronavirus?

“It’s about looking at trends and saying we’re not seeing what they’ve been talking about for the past six to eight weeks,” said Massihi, referring to predictions that up to 100,000 Americans could die of the virus and hospitals would become swamped with patients. “We’ve crippled the economy. There’s a lot of domestic issues going on. Is social isolation warranted for the healthy?”

Using the same calculation, Erickson estimates 12 percent of the population statewide, or some 4.7 million Californians, have already had COVID-19. With about 1,400 deaths so far in California, that puts the statewide death rate at about .03 percent, he said.

“Does that (low death rate) necessitate sheltering in place? Does that necessitate shutting down medical systems? Does that necessitate being out of work?” Erickson asked.

Nationwide, about 42,000 people have died of coronavirus as of Wednesday. Between 30,000 and 60,000 die of flu annually, Erickson said, citing CDC data.

The secondary effects of the shutdown are considerable, too, he said. They include a dramatic decrease in volumes at hospitals and even Erickson’s urgent care practice, where staff are mostly testing patients for COVID-19 these days.
“If you’re going to dance on someone’s constitutional rights you better have a good reason, you better have a really good reason, not just a theory,” he said. “The data is showing us it’s time to lift (the stay-at-home orders) so if we don’t lift, what is the reason?”
Video below:

In case YouTube decides to remove the video we have a Twitter link of the video:


Dr. Erickson, DO Accelerated Urgent Care, Bakersfield, CA Full press conference:Press conference credit 23 ABC News KERO&lt:

If this government-ordered shutdown continues for much more than another week or two, the human cost of job losses and bankruptcies will exceed what most Americans imagine. This won’t be popular to read in some quarters, but federal and state officials need to start adjusting their anti-virus strategy now to avoid an economic recession that will dwarf the harm from 2008-2009.

Much of the world economy has shuddered to a halt. In the United States alone, a record number of people filed for unemployment benefits in late March and this month. President Donald Trump once mused about lifting pandemic restrictions by mid-April to prevent more economic damage, but ultimately settled on extending federal advice to maintain physical distancing through the end of April.

Trump’s decision, however, has only put off the question of when, exactly, cities and states should begin to ease up on distancing orders. “If you keep the shutdown going for 2 months more than we need to, that’s just an unbelievably costly mistake.
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Natalie D.

Natalie D. is an American conservative writer who writes for Supreme Insider and Conservative US, ! Natalie has described herself as a polemicist who likes to "stir up the pot," and does not "pretend to be impartial or balanced, as broadcasters do," drawing criticism from the left, and sometimes from the right. As a passionate journalist, she works relentlessly to uncover the corruption happening in Washington. She is a "constitutional conservative".